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This course is the foundational course in economics. It introduces students to the economic way of thinking, the means of understanding systems of social coordination, of understanding phenomenon of human action but not human design. It begins with such concepts as marginal and average, opportunity cost, sunk cost, economic and accounting profit, and tradeoffs. These concepts culminate in the tools of supply and demand curves, and emphasis in this class is placed upon the use of these tools to gain insight into real world examples. The tools and analysis presented in this class will help to illuminate a wide range of social issues, from pollution to the pricing decisions of firms.  

This course is the foundational course in economics. It introduces students to the economic way of thinking, the means of understanding systems of social coordination, of understanding phenomenon of human action but not human design. It begins with such concepts as marginal and average, opportunity cost, sunk cost, economic and accounting profit, and tradeoffs. These concepts culminate in the tools of supply and demand curves, and emphasis in this class is placed upon the use of these tools to gain insight into real world examples. The tools and analysis presented in this class will help to illuminate a wide range of social issues, from pollution to the pricing decisions of firms.  

This course examines the application of mathematical and statistical techniques for business and management analysis and decision-making. Topics include statistical techniques (building on the content of the core statistics course), project management tools, time series analysis forecasting methods, quality control and decision making techniques in applied settings.

This course examines the application of mathematical and statistical techniques for business and management analysis and decision-making. Topics include statistical techniques (building on the content of the core statistics course), project management tools, time series analysis forecasting methods, quality control and decision making techniques in applied settings.

MTH 112 is an introductory course into the nature of Mathematics through the exposition of intuitive mathematical problems. It focuses on the beauty of Mathematics and the variety of ways one can approach questions asked in our daily life. Some of these problems include the nature of logic, the nature of numerical systems, techniques of counting (including Pascal’s triangle) together with an exposition of probability, and some applications to financial managements.

Pre-calculus continues the study of functions begun in College Algebra. The first part of the course will focus on the applications of previously studied functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic. Then, the course will turn toward the study of Trigonometry. This will include basic trigonometric relationships, the characteristics and properties of trigonometric functions, their inverses, trigonometric identities, and solving trigonometric equations. Conic sections and an introduction to the difference quotient will round out the course.

This course is an introduction to computers, related technology, and their use in society. Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, and the internet, as well as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, health, and the environment. Emphasis is placed on current uses and applications of the Internet as it relates to digital information and knowledge based systems. Students will learn how to use the most popular desktop and online application software systems. No prior computer experience is assumed.

This course introduces the fundamental building blocks that form a modern network, such as protocols, topologies, hardware, and network operating systems. It then provides in-depth coverage of the most important concepts in contemporary networking, such as TCP/IP, Ethernet, wireless transmission, and security. The course will prepare you to select the best network design, hardware, and software for your
environment. You will also have the skills to build a network from scratch and maintain, upgrade, and troubleshoot an existing network.

This course will provide students with hands-on experience of developing dynamic and interactive websites that combine graphics, audio, and video; and focuses on user centric software design and development. Technologies like HTML5, CSS3, jQuery/JavaScript, and frameworks like Twitter Bootstrap, will be introduced to design, and create dynamic and responsive websites that are cross-browser compatible on desktops, tablets, and mobile phones.

This course is an introduction to computers, related technology, and their use in society. Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, and the internet, as well as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, health, and the environment. Emphasis is placed on current uses and applications of the Internet as it relates to digital information and knowledge based systems. Students will learn how to use the most popular desktop and online application software systems. No prior computer experience is assumed.

This course is an introduction to computers, related technology, and their use in society. Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, and the internet, as well as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, health, and the environment. Emphasis is placed on current uses and applications of the Internet as it relates to digital information and knowledge based systems. Students will learn how to use the most popular desktop and online application software systems. No prior computer experience is assumed.

This course is an introduction to computers, related technology, and their use in society. Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, and the internet, as well as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, health, and the environment. Emphasis is placed on current uses and applications of the Internet as it relates to digital information and knowledge based systems. Students will learn how to use the most popular desktop and online application software systems. No prior computer experience is assumed.

MTH 112 is an introductory course into the nature of Mathematics through the exposition of intuitive mathematical problems. It focuses on the beauty of Mathematics and the variety of ways one can approach questions asked in our daily life. Some of these problems include the nature of logic, the nature of numerical systems, techniques of counting (including Pascal’s triangle) together with an exposition of probability, and some applications to financial managements.

MTH 112 is an introductory course into the nature of Mathematics through the exposition of intuitive mathematical problems. It focuses on the beauty of Mathematics and the variety of ways one can approach questions asked in our daily life. Some of these problems include the nature of logic, the nature of numerical systems, techniques of counting (including Pascal’s triangle) together with an exposition of probability, and some applications to financial managements

This course builds on ITE304: Fundamentals of Web Systems to introduce the students to deeper understandings of dynamic Web applications. Detailed coverage of concepts and tools such as server-side scripting languages, database driven Web sites, cookies and user authentications are the main core of the course.

This course provides an overview of the law and legal system of Iraq, providing theoretical and practical insight into the nature and function of law. This course will analyze the role of law in a social, economic, political and historical context, providing students with not only knowledge of legal rules but also a critical understanding of the operation of rules in society.

This course introduces you to international relations, one of the four sub-fields in political science. As a field of study, international relations focuses on the political, military, economic, and cultural interaction of state and non-state actors at the global level. The field therefore encompasses a diverse array of topics, from economic development to military conflict, from the environment to international institutions. In this course, we begin by exploring the key concepts, issues, and processes of international relations in order to provide the general knowledge and analytic tools necessary to understand, evaluate, and respond to a complex array of problems in the contemporary world. Historical case studies will be employed to analyze and compare conflicts and the foreign policies of contemporary regional and major powers.

Oil is the single most valuable commodity traded in global markets. This course introduces students to the petroleum industry and the political economy of countries endowed with petroleum resources. The class explores political and economic development in petrostates. Moreover, it analyzes the structure and behavior of countries and governments whose economies depend on petroleum exports. The course also focuses on how and why oil wealth might be a curse, and what policy options are available to turn oil into a blessing. Special attention will be given to the Iraqi and KRG petroleum policies and industries.
The course is open to students from all departments, especially international studies and business. Guest speakers from government and industry will be invited to speak to students. 

Who are we and where did we come from? Historians, archaeologists, philosophers, linguists, theologians and classicists have been asking and answering this basic question for centuries. But only since the model for DNA was published in 1953 have geneticists been able to seriously delve into the mysteries of human ancestry, migration, and domestication. This Core Option will allow students who have studied Life Science and Human Civilization to cross the boundaries between these two fields to learn how the DNA molecules inside every human cell tell stories of human ancestry and migration from Africa to the farthest reaches of the globe. In this course we will learn what DNA can,
and cannot, teach us about who we are, where we came from, and which plants and animals we brought with us on our journeys. And finally we will learn how to think about human societal groups that define themselves by genetics, culture, language, and philosophy. 

Who are we and where did we come from?  Historians, archaeologists, philosophers, linguists, theologians and classicists have been asking and answering this basic question for centuries. But only since the model for DNA was published in 1953 have geneticists been able to seriously delve into the mysteries of human ancestry, migration, and settlement. This Core Option will allow students to cross the boundaries between Life Science and Human Civilization by studying how the DNA molecules inside every human cell tell stories of migration from Africa to the farthest reaches of the globe. In this course we will learn what DNA can, and cannot, teach us about who we are, where we came from, and which plants and animals we brought with us on our journeys. The course will conclude with discussions about how human societal groups define themselves using different shared characteristics, such as genetics, culture and language.



The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of Web systems and technologies. The course covers the design, implementation and testing of Web based applications including related software, databases, interfaces, and digital media. It also touches on the social, ethical, and security issues arising from Web based software. Students will be introduced to different Web system components using HTML, XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript. The course uses simple conventional text editors to put the students into hard coding using the above tagging and scripting languages. The practical part of the course focuses on programming and developing Web pages and applications that emphasis the concepts and the tools covered in the course.


"Course Description:
The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of Web systems and technologies. The course covers the design, implementation and testing of Web based applications including related software, databases, interfaces, and digital media. It also touches on the social, ethical, and security issues arising from Web based software. Students will be introduced to different Web system components using HTML, XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript. The course uses simple conventional text editors to put the students into hard coding using the above tagging and scripting languages. The practical part of the course focuses on programming and developing Web pages and applications that emphasis the concepts and the tools covered in the course.

Course Goal:
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and emerging technologies of Web systems and the Internet.

Course Objectives:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.Describe the structure of the World Wide Web and the importance of the HTTP protocol.
2.Create and validate HTML/XHTML documents and using presentation skills such as CSS.
3.Understand the differences between static and dynamic Web pages and their use.
4.Understand client-side vs. server-side programming and their use.
5.Construct interactive Web pages using JavaScript as a client-side scripting language.
"

This course introduces students to the chronological scope of human history from 1450 to the present. Students will examine the social, cultural, technical, economic, and political transformations that have shaped world civilizations. The course emphasizes the development of necessary university-level skills such as critical thinking and clarity of expression. Students will continue to develop skills in critical reading of primary texts.

The course examines major political systems including those of a democratic, authoritarian, and totalitarian nature. Comparative politics is both a subject and a method in that the subject is the study of countries other than one's own while the method is to compare and contrast the politics of those countries in order to identify similarities and explain differences. This process often includes a study of the nature of political systems and thought with a historical focus and its attendant impact on the modern world. The course examines both the developed as well as the developing world while seeking to expand the student's understanding of modern political systems through comparison of political systems in selected countries.

The course examines major political systems including those of a democratic, authoritarian, and totalitarian nature. Comparative politics is both a subject and a method in that the subject is the study of countries other than one's own while the method is to compare and contrast the politics of those countries in order to identify similarities and explain differences. This process often includes a study of the nature of political systems and thought with a historical focus and its attendant impact on the modern world. The course examines both the developed as well as the developing world while seeking to expand the student's understanding of modern political systems through comparison of political systems in selected countries.

This course introduces students to the practice of the martial art of T’ai Chi Ch’uan. From the standpoint of practice, students will learn proper etiquette, terminology, appropriate conditioning exercises, elements of Chi Kung sets, and a T’ai Chi Ch’uan form. From the standpoint of theory, students will learn about the history of T’ai Chi Ch’uan and about the philosophic foundations of the practice of T’ai Chi Ch’uan. In addition to martial arts practice, students will be required to write about their practice in a journal format and in response to readings undertaken in the course.

The second in the Civilization course sequence examines the sweep of history from the Middle Ages through the Age of Exploration. The course combines a chronological approach with a humanities-based emphasis on reading and interpreting primary texts. Topics include the intellectual culture of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the influence of technological innovation on history and the arts, and the development of various political and social structures in response to forces of historical change. The course emphasizes the development of students’ academic writing skills.

In this course, students will develop their ability to recognize, analyze, invent, and present arguments. As students read and respond to texts, they will come to understand and, in their own writing and thinking, avoid logical fallacies. Students will also learn and develop the fundamentals of public speaking.  Through this course students will receive an introduction to academic citation and formatting. Each of the requisite composition courses, through written and oral assessments, measures each student’s continued progress as an academic writer and thinker.

The third in the Civilization course sequence examines the creation of the modern world, during the age of industrialization, the rise of the nation-state, and imperialism. The course combines a chronological approach with a humanities-based emphasis on reading and interpreting primary texts. Students will refine their academic writing and research skills.

This course will introduce students to writing and speaking at the college level. With respect to writing, students will develop fluency in writing in various modes as they continue to develop their skills with respect to editing and proofreading. With respect to speaking, students will develop skills requisite to various situations—teaching, demonstrating, orating, and debating. Throughout the course emphasis will be placed on argument—recognizing it, analyzing it, inventing it, and presenting it.

This course is a seminar devoted to the careful study of democratic theory which ties together the various disciplines learned throughout the International Studies major – history, political philosophy, ancient and modern politics, and economic theory and practice. Students bring these matters to bear to gain a fuller understanding of democratic theory and the philosophy of liberty. A thesis that discusses some aspect of these issues and their relevance for an emerging free, prosperous and democratic Iraq will be required.

This course is a survey of of a selection of significant events in Thucydides' Peloponnesian War with constant reference to events--ancient and modern.  In short, the course will be an analysis of the particular problem of the anarchic international system.  Topics to be considered in this survey may include but will not be limited to the source of wars, strategy, leadership, alliances, and treaties.

This course is a survey of ethical thinking, including various theories, outlooks, and approaches. The course places a strong emphasis on the question of what makes a good human being and good citizen.

This course is a survey of the ideas of major ancient and modern political philosophers.  Emphasis is placed on close reading and critical interpretation of selected primary texts. 

This course is a survey of various political ideas (liberalism, socialism, Marxism), political forms (democracy, authoritarianism, totalitarianism), and political institutions (presidential and parliamentary systems; federal and unitary systems). Some attention may also be given to questions related to leadership, political parties, interest groups, and media in politics.

As one of the greatest writers in English, Shakespeare merits exclusive study. Students will look at his plays and his poetry, analyzing his work both in its historical context and in our contemporary context. Students will also look at how these texts have contributed to the modern and contemporary canon, helping writers who have derived their characters, plots, figures of speech from Shakespeare. Students will read these texts for the pleasure of the language and to understand how they have served as a matrix for the literature that followed.

This course focuses on the politics and international relations of the modern Middle East. In doing so, it seeks to apply the major concepts of the discipline of political science and international relations to the study of the contemporary Middle East. Hence the basic assumption of the course is that, while the politics of the Middle East may possess specific characteristics, it is not unique. The emphasis of the course is on comparing political phenomena across the region. The themes adopted in the course include some traditional fields of study, such as the military, ideology and the notion of legitimacy, together with some newer fields, notably political economy, civil society and gender. The influence of major inter-state conflicts and external factors on domestic politics will also be considered. 

This course introduces students to the chronological scope of human history from 1450 to the present. Students will examine the social, cultural, technical, economic, and political transformations that have shaped world civilizations. The course emphasizes the development of necessary university-level skills such as critical thinking and clarity of expression.

This course is a survey of the development of social, political, and cultural life in the Middle East between the early sixteenth century and the late twentieth century.  The class will examine key issues in Middle Eastern history, investigate a wide variety of primary sources, and discuss critical issues that led to the creation of the modern Middle East.  The topics covered in this course include:  the expansion and ‘decline’ of Ottoman and Safavid empires between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, the growth Western political, economic and intellectual influence in the region during the nineteenth  and twentieth centuries, the formation of the modern state system following the First World War as well as the emergence of  nationalist, socialist and religious political movements.

This course introduces students to the chronological scope of human history from the agricultural revolution to 1450. Students will examine the social, cultural, technical, economic, and political transformations that have shaped world civilizations. The course emphasizes the development of necessary university-level skills such as critical thinking and clarity of expression. Students will be introduced to critical reading of primary texts.

“This course will introduce students to writing and speaking at the college level. With respect to writing, students will develop fluency in writing in various rhetorical modes as they continue to develop their skills with respect to editing and proofreading. With respect to speaking, students will develop skills requisite to various situations—specifically, orating, and debating. Throughout the course emphasis will be placed on argument—recognizing it, analyzing it, inventing it, and presenting it.”

“An introduction to the practice of photography, including camera skills, composing and presenting images, and
photographic analysis. May be taken as a Humanities Core Option.”

“Students will move between study and practice, examining what makes a good photograph, what makes a good photo-essay, and how to blend the utilitarian with the aesthetic. Students will also look to historical and contemporary sources to structure our thinking about our own photographic projects.”

“In this course, students will learn the structures, terminology, and process of basic news-writing. Students will learn to identify bias – their own and others’ – and to guard against it in their presentation of the news. As in every writing course, students will read as writers, deriving a practical understanding of news-writing precepts.”

This course explores the role of money in the economy and provides an overview of financial markets and financial institutions, including the banking industry. Financial markets and institutions, which are becoming more globally interconnected, involve the flow of huge quantities of money and affect our everyday life in various ways by affecting the availability of credits to consumers and producers, production and availability of goods and services, business profits, and the overall economic well-being of countries. What happens to financial markets, financial institutions, and money is of great concern to governments and politicians who want to be reelected. Various topics related to financial markets and institutions such as the duration and term structure of interest rates, exchange rate markets, banking and management of financial institutions, asset/liability management, risk and credit management are covered. The class also explains central banking, the conduct of monetary policy, and international finance. We will also discuss the recent subprime mortgage and financial crisis. The course will help you to understand the importance of money, banking, and financial markets in an economy and teach how they are interrelated and function. It is hoped that you will understand what is written in publications such as the Wall Street Journal and the Economist much more easily after taking this class. 

Europe today appears to have left the old imperial, nationalist, and ideological rivalries behind. The disastrous wars/conflicts of the 20th century –WWI, WWII, and the Cold War—have become something of the past. Starting from the 1950s, Europe’s continuing but irregular pace of integration has reached an unprecedented level, bringing peace and prosperity to much of Europe. The European Union is the most advanced experiment of regional integration and “supranational” governance beyond traditional nation-states and intergovernmental cooperation. It is a unique experience in many ways. This course is designed to explore the dynamics of this experience over the past 50 years within a historical and geographical context, considering political, economic, institutional, and cultural factors. 

The Middle East continues to be an area of tremendous strategic, political, economic, and cultural importance. With the recent Arab Spring and the ongoing Syrian crisis, The Middle East continues to occupy a top place on the World Politics agenda.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the international relations of the states of the Middle East from the perspectives of the International Relations Theory and International Political Economy disciplines. The course will survey Middle Eastern history, with a special emphasis on the post-WWII period, as well as demographic, economic, and political facts. But, it will focus on the region’s interrelations with the outside world as well as on analytical approaches in order to gain a deeper understanding of the nature and content of Middle East international relations. The course will also involve the policies of the United States and other outside powers toward the region, the role of the United Nations, inter-regional interactions, and regional actor policies toward non-Middle Eastern actors. It will enable students to identify the major political, economic, and strategic features of the region as well as factors, both external and internal, which help to explain the area’s shifting dynamics. 

Economic development refers to the qualitative and quantitative changes in the economy of a country or a region that lead to a higher standard of living. It is not limited to economic growth, which mainly refers to a rise of real GDP due to factors such as productivity, efficiency, and aggregate supply & demand conditions in the economy. Few regions of the world have achieved a high standard of living; other regions of the world are either developing or remaining as less developed. This course asks why there are these differences and how can developing and less developed countries also increase their standards of living. Multiple factors - from geography to political stability, from concerted actions of economic policy makers to social and political institutions, from economic systems to policies of international organizations, such as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and UN - affect a country’s economic development. This course introduces students to theories of economic development and surveys a wide range of economic development issues.

This course considers the domestic and global economic environment of business and its impact on management planning and decision making. It aims to teach various concepts and analytical tools of economics as well as economic logic in order to help students to understand the economic issues and events occurring around them. This subject has two broad areas: Microeconomics focuses on how individual decision-makers behave and interact in markets. Macroeconomics sees the economy as composed of several broad groups of decision-makers-- particularly households, firms, and governments--and studies how the interaction of these groups affects the aggregate performance of the economy. The class combines these two complementary approaches. Economics topics covered include but are not limited to: how economics and the world of business are related, the supply and demand model and how markets work, costs of production, revenue and profit, the macroeconomic environment of businesses, GDP and economic growth, how government policies affect markets and economic performance, why inflation, recession and unemployment occur and their effects, comparative advantage and trade, globalization and multinational business, international trade and trading blocs, and the balance of payments.


"This course surveys the important and contemporary issues of international trade, economic and financial globalization, and international trade and finance institutions from theInternational Political Economy standpoint without going into the details ofeconomic theories. It discusses how state and non-state business/financialactors pursue wealth and power, and how they compete. It illustrates how international trade and financial matters are political as well as economic and financial in their nature, and how trade and finance policies as outcomes of political competition create winners and losers. The range of topics covered include WTO and the world trade system, the international monetary system and IMF, the World Bank, trade blocks and trade politics, trade and development, multinational corporations, foreign exchange rate policies and markets, international finance, financial crises, as well as some analytical tools and theoretical explanations, such as hegemonic stability theory.

While the class pays close attention to fundamental economic concepts, it also highlights the interplay between domestic and international politics, and explains how the global economy works from an interdisciplinary perspective. The class strongly encourages studentsto think critically about topics covered. "

This course surveys the important and contemporary issues and institutions of international trade and finance, and discusses the effects of economic / financial globalization from the International Political Economy (IPE) standpoint without going into the details of economic theories. It illustrates how international trade and financial matters are political as well as economic and financial in their nature, and how trade and finance policies as outcomes of political competition create winners and losers. The range of topics covered include WTO and the world trade system, trade politics and trade blocks, trade and development, politics of multinational corporations, the international monetary system and IMF, effects of foreign exchange rate policies on trade and finance, as well as financial crises. The class also teaches IPE analytical tools and theoretical explanations that help to analyze and explain international trade and economic relations. 

This course surveys the important and contemporary issues and institutions of international trade and finance, and discusses the effects of economic / financial globalization from the International Political Economy (IPE) standpoint without going into the details of economic theories. It illustrates how international trade and financial matters are political as well as economic and financial in their nature, and how trade and finance policies as outcomes of political competition create winners and losers. The range of topics covered include WTO and the world trade system, trade politics and trade blocks, trade and development, politics of multinational corporations, the international monetary system and IMF, effects of foreign exchange rate policies on trade and finance, as well as financial crises. The class also teaches IPE analytical tools and theoretical explanations that help to analyze and explain international trade and economic relations. 

This course is the first step in business learning and covers various business-related topics at an introductory level.  The topics covered include entrepreneurship, business ethics, businesses’ legal, economic, financial, and global environments, business management and organization, marketing, the role of information technologies, accounting information, and financial management.  This course uses an integrated approach to help students appreciate the interrelationships of various business functions and, more generally, the role of business in society. 

ECO 201: Principles and History of Economics

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts necessary for understand spontaneous orders and phenomenon of human action but not human design. This course takes the form of a survey of selected important
thinkers in economics, including such individuals as Smith, Mill, Malthus, Marx, Keynes, Friedman, Hayek, and Buchanan. The evolution of broad trends in economic thinking is thus taught sequentially, with reference to original texts and historical figures. A focus is placed on major trends in the field and foundational concepts like gains from trade and specialization, tradeoffs and opportunity costs, and the importance of incentives.

Prerequisites: No prerequisite

ECO 201: Principles and History of Economics

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts necessary for understand spontaneous orders and phenomenon of human action but not human design. This course takes the form of a survey of selected important
thinkers in economics, including such individuals as Smith, Mill, Malthus, Marx, Keynes, Friedman, Hayek, and Buchanan. The evolution of broad trends in economic thinking is thus taught sequentially, with reference to original texts and historical figures. A focus is placed on major trends in the field and foundational concepts like gains from trade and specialization, tradeoffs and opportunity costs, and the importance of incentives.

Prerequisites: No prerequisite

This course examines the performance, structure, and behavior of the entire economy, be that a national, regional, or the global economy from a comparative and global perspective. It studies fundamental principles of macroeconomic analysis and teaches related macroeconomic concepts. Topics discussed include the measurement and evaluation of economic performance, GDP, economic growth, productivity, unemployment, inflation, international trade, the role of government, money and banking, and fiscal and monetary policies in a market or mixed economy.

This course is the foundational course in economics and introduces students to the economic way of thinking and analyzing. It studies the behavior of individuals, households, and firms under different market structures, and covers topics such as opportunity cost, marginal and average cost, sunk costs, accounting and economic profits, supply and demand, elasticity, pricing of resources, regulations, and comparative advantage and trade.  Additional topics include the economics of taxation, stock market, corporate governance, negative and positive externalities, and public goods. The course teaches various analytical tools to help students analyze and understand these topics and their economic environment. 

This course is the foundational course in economics and introduces students to the economic way of thinking and analyzing. It studies the behavior of individuals, households, and firms under different market structures, and covers topics such as opportunity cost, marginal and average cost, sunk costs, accounting and economic profits, supply and demand, elasticity, pricing of resources, regulations, and comparative advantage and trade.  Additional topics include the economics of taxation, stock market, corporate governance, and gains from international trade. The course teaches various analytical tools to help students analyze and understand their economic environment. 

ECO 301: Principles of Microeconomics

This course is the foundational course in economics. It introduces students to the economic way of thinking, the means of understanding systems of social coordination, of understanding phenomenon of human action but not human design. It begins with such concepts as marginal and average, opportunity cost, sunk cost, economic and accounting profit, and tradeoffs. These concepts culminate in the tools of supply and demand curves, and emphasis in this class is placed upon the use of these tools to gain insight into real world examples. The tools and analysis presented in this
class will help to illuminate a wide range of social issues, from pollution to the pricing decisions of firms.

Prerequisites: No prerequisite

ECO 301: Principles of Microeconomics

This course is the foundational course in economics. It introduces students to the economic way of thinking, the means of understanding systems of social coordination, of understanding phenomenon of human action but not human design. It begins with such concepts as marginal and average, opportunity cost, sunk cost, economic and accounting profit, and tradeoffs. These concepts culminate in the tools of supply and demand curves, and emphasis in this class is placed upon the use of these tools to gain insight into real world examples. The tools and analysis presented in this class will help to illuminate a wide range of social issues, from pollution to the pricing decisions of firms.

Prerequisites: No prerequisite

 Public Choice Economics uses economic tools and methods to analyze how politics and government work. The course questions how individuals make collective choices, why do we have a government, how do voters, politicians, and bureaucrats behave in the public sphere. It demonstrates that voters, politicians, and government officials respond the incentives they face. The course examines how these players’ actions, as responses to the incentives that they face, lead to political, economic, and social outcomes in the democratic political process. These outcomes vary depending upon the rule structures and constitutions within which politicians and bureaucrats operate. Therefore, these outcomes and structures are compared with one another and emphasis is placed on real world outcomes. The class covers topics such as difficulties of collective action by large groups, rent-seeking activities of interest groups (or concentrated groups), voters’ behavior under different voting systems, collective choice within government, effects of legislative structures on policy outcomes, behavior of bureaucracy, and regulation.

This seminar offers students a selective introduction to the aesthetic, intellectual, social, scientific, and cultural developments of world civilization before 1450 through a series of in-depth encounters with primary sources.​The course will include readings from various kinds of written sources, supplemented with visual and aural sources as appropriate.​In addition, students may also encounter art, music, and architecture as they read. Students will develop skills in critical reading and will write short papers.

This course is a survey of the ideas of major ancient and modern political philosophers. Emphasis is placed on close reading and critical interpretation of selected primary texts.

This course studies the founding text of international relations: Thucydides' history of the Peloponessian War.
This course is an examination of basic political questions through works of speculative fiction.
This course studies a collection of seminal texts in medieval Islamic philosophy.  
This course studies basic questions of epistemology (how we know what we know) and ethics (how do we determine the difference between right and wrong behavior) through the study original, classic books.

This course is an examination of the integration of computing technologies, systems analysis design practices, and management criteria in the design of large-scale information management and decision-support systems, includes case studies and computing lab. This course also examines how managerial and analytic functions in public and private organizations can be performed via various computer-based applications, and provides in-depth coverage of selected decision support package.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a disciplined approach to computer programming and problem solving, utilizing a high level programming language such as Java. Programming constructs such as sequential structure, selection structures, and repetition structures will be explained; through which students will have a grasp of Structured Programming notions as well. Variables, conditionals, loop structures: for/while/do-while, break/continue, one and multi-dimensional arrays, and basics of object oriented programming are covered.

The practical part of the course focuses on programming and developing application programs that emphasis the concepts and the tools covered in the course

The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of Web systems and
technologies. The course covers the design, implementation and testing of Web based
applications including related software, databases, interfaces, and digital media. It also touches
on the social, ethical, and security issues arising from Web based software. Students will be
introduced to different Web system components using HTML, XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript.
The course uses simple conventional text editors to put the students into hard coding using the
above tagging and scripting languages. The practical part of the course focuses on programming
and developing Web pages and applications that emphasis the concepts and the tools covered in
the course.Fundamentals of Web Systems

The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the object-oriented programming
(OOP) paradigm building on the procedural programming paradigm covered in their previous
programming courses. A pure object-oriented programming language such as Java or C# is
going to be used in the course. Problem analysis, solution design, debugging, and decision
making all are well covered as part of this course using an OOP paradigm. Students also
experiment building graphical-user interface (GUI) applications. The practical part of the course
focuses on programming and developing application programs that emphasis the concepts and
the tools covered in the course.

This course is an examination of the integration of computing technologies, systems analysis design practices, and management criteria in the design of large-scale information management and decision-support systems, includes case studies and computing lab. This course also examines how managerial and analytic functions in public and private organizations can be performed via various computer-based applications, and provides in-depth coverage of selected decision support package.

Project Management is now a key concern of many major companies particularly those that operate under a project oriented structure. This course provides the student with the skills expected of a Project Manager. The course pays particular attention to the skills relevant to IT projects but is general in nature. 

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of human-computer interaction (HCI), including human factors, performance analysis, cognitive processing, usability studies, environment, and training. It covers the interfaces, emerging technologies, human-centered software, and accessibility.

This Moodle Course is intended to support first semester students in the Undergraduate program. 

This course will introduce students to the field of Psychology. Via lectures, discussions, and activities, students will familiarize themselves with psychological concepts and apply them to their own lives. Attention will be paid to Sociobiology, Development, Perception, Personality, Industrial / Organizational Psychology, Educational Psychology, Psychopathology & Therapies, Language & Communication, Health & Stress, and Social Psychology. Themes include the crucial role of evidence in Psychology, and ways that Psychology can improve our quality of life. 

This course will introduce students to the field of Conflict Resolution, from a Social Psychological perspective. Via lectures, discussions, activities, and assessments, students will familiarize themselves with psychological concepts and apply them to their own lives. Attention will be paid to social psychology, social learning & behaviorism, roles & behavior, response to authority, the biological basis for group formation, and social constructs like ethnicity, race, religion, gender, language, and political affiliation. After studying the sources of conflict, students will practice resolving conflicts: active listening and interest-based negotiation. There are three recurring themes in the course: Conflict can be adaptive. Conflict can be mitigated. Conflict can be avoided. 

Welcome to Psychology 101!
This course will introduce students to the field of Psychology. Via lectures, discussions, and activities, students will familiarize themselves with psychological concepts and apply them to their own lives. Attention will be paid to Sociobiology, Development, Perception, Personality, Industrial / Organizational Psychology, Educational Psychology, Psychopathology & Therapies, Language & Communication, Health & Stress, and Social Psychology. Themes include the crucial role of evidence in Psychology, and ways that Psychology can improve our quality of life.

This library course will help you define information tasks and identify information needed in business and economics, whether for study, work or personal purposes. You will be guided in determining all possible sources, selecting the best ones and locating them either on the library's shelves or in databases and websites. You will then learn how to engage with and extract information from these sources, how to organize and present the information and how to properly credit your sources. Finally, you will learn how to judge the effectiveness of the information product that you create and the efficiency of your information-seeking process. The course will also show you ways of keeping up to date with the latest information in your area of interest.
Introduction to computer-aided design (CAD). This course will introduce graphical communication as a tool in documenting the results of an engineering design. Emphasis is placed on the use of Computer Aided Drafting and 3-D Solid Modeling systems to prepare working drawings packages of basic components and assemblies. Students combine the practice of sketching along with computer-based solid modeling to produce a parametric design. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to prepare working drawings, with appropriate views, dimensions, title blocks, and bill of materials.
Prerequisite: CSC 101
Credits: 2

Analysis of bodies in equilibrium with vector algebra and classical applications. Properties of forces, moments, centroids, trusses, frames, machines, equilibrium conditions, friction, area moments of inertia, shear and bending moment diagrams.
Prerequisite: PHYS 233
Credits: 3

Fundamentals of Thermodynamics.

CIV 203 tackles important questions regarding the human condition within in their historical context. It examines how perceptions, ideas and social organizations have changed over time as well as the ways in which people in different places and times have sought to answer certain ‘big questions.’ Such questions transcend ‘civilizational’ divides and are part of our common humanity and hence, this course takes a comparative approach. Students will engage with questions that are relevant to present-day dilemmas in their society.
CIV 203 - Empires: Foundations, Myths, and History
This particular iteration of CIV 203 will compare and contrast early and Medieval empires through the lens of two types of primary texts, ‘objective’ written histories and inscriptions, and literary epics. We will explore the myths of cultural and political self-designation of early Mesopotamia, Rome, ancient China, ancient Persia, and the nomadic empires of the ‘Celestial’ (Gok) Turuk and the imperial Mongols as samples of cultural self-definition. We will supplement our inquiry through visual sources drawn from these cultural complexes. Through this, we will investigate expectations of rulers, composition of peoples in the empire (inclusive or exclusive, and why), the role of the arts in these political entities, including the role of the arts as propaganda, bias, patronage and other questions. An accurate examination will require an awareness of the context of these primary sources, and so, we will not only review material from CIV 101, but also supplementary secondary texts may be assigned in class.  

This course introduces students to the chronological scope of human history from the agricultural revolution to 1450. Students will examine the social, cultural, technical, economic, and political transformations that have shaped world civilizations. The course emphasizes the development of necessary university-level skills such as critical thinking and clarity of expression. Students will be introduced to critical reading of primary texts.

This course introduces students to the chronological scope of human history from the agricultural revolution to 1450. Students will examine the social, cultural, technical, economic, and political transformations that have shaped world civilizations. The course emphasizes the development of necessary university-level skills such as critical thinking and clarity of expression. Students will be introduced to critical reading of primary texts.

This course introduces students to the chronological scope of human history from 1450 to the present. Students will examine the social, cultural, technical, economic, and political transformations that have shaped world civilizations. The course emphasizes the development of necessary university-level skills such as critical thinking and clarity of expression. Students will continue to develop skills in critical reading of primary texts.
Prerequisite: CIV 101  

This course introduces the fundamental building blocks that form a modern network, such as protocols, topologies, hardware, and network operating systems.  It then provides in-depth coverage of the most important concepts in contemporary networking, such as TCP/IP, Ethernet, wireless transmission, and security.  The course will prepare you to select the best network design, hardware, and software for your environment.  You will also have the skills to build a network from scratch and maintain, upgrade, and troubleshoot an existing network.

This course provides students with an introduction to the core concepts in data and information management. It is centered around the core skills of identifying organization of information requirements, modeling them using conceptual data modeling techniques, converting the conceptual data models into relational data models, verifying the relational data models’ structural characteristics with normalization techniques, and implementing and utilizing a relational database using an enterprise database management system.

This course builds on knowledge acquired during the Introduction to Databases' course. Concepts considered include Tuning and Administration of Database objects. Procedures and Triggers are introduced.

This course introduces Information Security concepts and works through worksheets and select labs to discuss practical applications of some topics.

This course prepares students with the knowledge and skills required to install, operate, and troubleshoot a small to medium size enterprise network. The TCP/IP and OSI models are covered extensively and IP addressing, operating and configuring IOS devices including VLANS emphasized. IP routes, managing IP traffic with access lists are covered as well.

 

Introduction to Computers and Applications

Introduction to Computers and Applications

An introductory course on core data and management of information concepts leading up to the utilization of relational database approaches.
Addressing the gap between the ends and means bridging IS articulation and IT acquisition
Professional Communications and Ethics examines the influences that professional behavior has on societal best practices in the way that IT is conducted. This is especially significant when considering the many areas that IT touches that border on integrity and confidentiality aspects.

This course discusses ethics in IT and dealing with various ethical dilemmas in decision making. Unambiguous communication and presentation skills that are expected to be acquired in this course.

This course builds on MGT 201 by focusing on the necessary skills and abilities of the successful leader and manager and the appropriate motivational techniques they use to achieve high performance levels. Students are not only introduced to these success factors, but are challenged to both assess and develop their own leadership skills
throughout the course.

Prerequisites: MGT 201 and MGT 301

Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to the concepts, principles, problems and practices of operations management. Emphasis is on managerial processes for effective operations in both goods-producing and service-rendering organization. Topics include operations strategy, process design, capacity planning, facilities location and design, forecasting, production scheduling, inventory control, quality assurance, and project management. The topics are integrated using a systems model of the operations for an organization.

Prerequisite: BUS 303

Credits: 3

This course examines the application of mathematical and statistical techniques for business and management analysis and decision-making. Topics include statistical techniques (building on the content of the core statistics course), project management tools, time series analysis forecasting methods, quality control and decision making techniques
in applied settings.

Prerequisites: ECO 221 and STT 201

Credits: 3

This three-credit course will holistically prepare students to plan for their careers with intention and agency. It will give students a toolkit to answer questions about who they are, what their career goals are, and how to achieve them. Along with building practical job-search skills, the course will develop professional behavior and goal-setting skills. Students will explore their personalities, values, strengths, and roles as citizens, and use these insights to plan for meaningful and satisfying careers in a pluralistic and global society.

This course is an introduction to computers, related technology, and their use in society. Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, and the Internet, as well as security, privacy, intellectual property rights, health, and the environment. Emphasis is placed on current uses and applications of the Internet as it relates to digital information and knowledge based systems. Students will learn how to use the most popular desktop and online application software systems. No prior computer experience is assumed.

The capstone module offers students the opportunity to develop their analytical and critical skills in an IT project based on a topic, selected by the student, which will be approved and supervised by a member of the teaching team. Project implementation requires the student to implement their design and make any justified modification to their chosen project using suitable tools and techniques.

This course covers the fundamental principles of developing mobile applications and Android will be used as the target platform. Students will explore design, development, testing and deployment of mobile applications using Eclipse IDE and Android SDK. Topics include Android SDK, design principles, application structure and styles, UI (user interface), content storage and its management. Several core Android APIs will be covered.

The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the object-oriented programming (OOP) paradigm building on the procedural programming paradigm covered in their previous programming courses. A pure object-oriented programming language such as Java or C# is going to be used in the course. Problem analysis, solution design, debugging, and decision making all are well covered as part of this course using an OOP paradigm. Students also experiment building graphical-user interface (GUI) applications. The practical part of the course focuses on programming and developing application programs that emphasis the concepts and the tools covered in the course.

This course will provide students with hands-on experience of developing dynamic and interactive websites that combine graphics, audio, and video; and focuses on user centric software design and development. Technologies like HTML5, CSS3, jQuery/JavaScript,and frameworks like Twitter Bootstrap, will be introduced to design, and create dynamic and responsive websites that are cross-browser compatible on desktops, tablets, and mobile phones.

This course introduces students to the basic components of IT systems, including databases, programming, and networking, with both theoretical introduction and practical experience. This course is designed in such a way that helps students to make decisions regarding their major and minor selection based on realistic experience with the discipline and level of expectations. Therefore, this course works as an entry, rigorous, and filtering course to all other IT courses and as a prerequisite to all other IT courses.

A resource page for study and testing strategies. 

This course will introduce students to water resources in Iraq. Through case studies and selected primary readings, we will examine how water resources of the Tigris, Euphrates, and Shatt el Arab rivers have been used in the past, how they are used now, and how current management practices and climate change could impact their availability in the future. The course will include comparative case studies on the physical and environmental characteristics of the world’s major river basins and how they compare to the Tigris/Euphrates. We also will discuss the roles of science in negotiation and decision-making within the context of water resources and diplomacy.

This course will carefully examine life on the planet Earth and the methods by which scientists observe natural phenomena, test hypotheses using inductive and deductive reasoning, analyze and interpret scientific data, and synthesize the resulting knowledge to understand biological diversity. Through readings, class discussions, and problem-solving exercises, students will consider the diversity and classification of living organisms; the processes that govern their structure and function at multiple scales; their mechanisms of reproduction, inheritance and evolution; and their interactions with the external environment.

STT 201 - Statistics, Credits: 3, Prerequisites: MTH 112, MTH122, MTH132
This course studies the fundamentals of Statistics, including Probability, the Laws of Chance, Statistical Measures (mean, mode, median, scatter, standard deviation, skewness) and Descriptive Statistics (with attention to frequency distributions, and the use and interpretation of tables, graphs and charts), Statistical Distributions (binomial, Poisson, normal), Statistical Analysis (with attention to correlation analysis and statistical significance), Statistical Inference (with attention to sampling techniques, confidence levels and sample size), and Statistical Forecasting (projection techniques and time series analysis). Students will be introduced to the differing uses of statistics: how natural and social scientists, businesses and governments use statistics in their own ways, for their own purposes.